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Covid 19 Curiosities

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Nothing has been normal about the last thirteen months. The daily news of deaths, infections, vaccinations, and updates from the CDC has sadly become background noise to many. Here are a few choice related stories, mostly from NY State :

81 Year old Man Almost Dies, Judge Orders Lifesaving Drug Treatments

A drug that the FDA has not approved for Covid 19 treatment has been getting plenty of news. This was not the first time a judge has mandated a healthcare provider to administer Intermectin to a patient. Genesee County farmer John Swanson, was near death when State Supreme Court Justice Frederick J. Marshall ordered that United Memorial Healthcare Center give Swanson Intermectin. Since the drug was administered Swanson made a quick turnaround and is now listed as “stable”.

Pier One Employee Jailed for Coughing on Cancer Patient

After she tried to record a nasty argument between a store employee and customers, Heather Sprague of Jacksonville FL, was confronted by the store employee. Debra Hunter made rude hand gestures toward Sprague and then threatened to “cough on her”.

The threat wasn’t hollow; Hunter coughed on Sprague, was battling cancer at the time. She and her family went into a panic trying to find testing sites and isolating just in case. In the end she tested negative but Hunter still was firmly prosecuted for the offense. 30 days in jail, $500 fine, 6 months probation, and required anger management classes.

Johnson and Johnson One Shot Vaccine Shortage

Both the “J&J” and Governor Cuomo announced that New York State will be particularly impacted by a vaccine shortage. The vaccine is in high demand because it is only one dose and supply has been hampered by a 1.5 million dose spoilage. The allotment provided to New York State will drop by 88%, leaving clinics and hospitals with the Moderna or the Pfizer vaccine.

Three Foot Is The New School Rule

Schools in New York got the new “guidance” from the state allowing students to only keep three feet away from other students and staff, instead of six feet. This thirty six inches will allow students to now be close enough to pass notes, whisper the latest class gossip, and likely drive teachers another shade of crazy.

Complicating the matter is the current CDC guidance for transportation and cafeterias: One student per bus seat and six feet between students while eating. The new three foot rule may help smaller schools get back to in-person learning, but densely populated schools still have plenty of challenges.

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